By admin       2018-10-15

Spot cotton trading was inactive. Supplies and producer offerings were light. Demand was moderate. Average local spot prices were higher. Trading of CCC-loan equities was inactive. Hurricane Michael made landfall on the Florida Panhandle early Wednesday afternoon between Mexico Beach and Tindall Air Force Base as a category 4 storm. This is the first time on record that a category 4 storm has made landfall on the Florida Panhandle. Sustained wind gusts of 130 to 140 mph were recorded along the eyewall of the storm. Heavy rainfall, flash flooding, and catastrophic damage to some structures was reported as power lines and trees were blown down and roofs were blown off some buildings in the path of the storm. Hundreds of thousands remained without power in the lower Southeast. The storm maintained a category 3 hurricane level as it tracked across the most extreme southeastern counties of Alabama and entered into the plains of southwest Georgia, where it was downgraded to a tropical storm. Precipitation amounts ranged from 3 to 6 inches across the Florida panhandle and throughout Georgia. Strong winds tangled plants and blew lint out of bolls and heavy rainfall strung out fiber. Before the storm arrived, producers attempted to harvest as much lint off of the stalk as possible. Ahead of the storm, ginners worked around the clock to transport modules from fields and complete pressing operations. Local experts were assessing damage from the storm. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s Crop Progress report released October 9, cotton harvested reached 19 percent in Alabama and 12 percent in Georgia. Remnants of Tropical Storm Michael drifted into the upper Southeast early Thursday morning bringing strong winds, rain, and tornadic activity to the region throughout the day. Feeder bands from the storm produced heavy rainfall throughout the day producing flash flooding, downed trees, and power outages for thousands. Precipitation totals measured from 3 to 6 inches of rainfall, with heavier amounts recorded locally. In North Carolina, producers attempted to salvage fields ahead of the storm that were recently battered by Hurricane Florence, but harvest was difficult in fields that remained tangled and suffered heavy lint loss. Defoliation and harvesting expanded in the Carolinas and harvesting was getting underway in Virginia. Local experts were assessing damage from the storm. According the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s Crop Progress report released October 9, cotton harvested reached 10 percent in South Carolina, 8 in North Carolina, and 3 percent in Virginia.

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